20 8 / 2014

shakespeareinthesnark said: super pretentious (but also really interesting) note: the word accent is formally only correct when talking about the way someone speaks a language other than their first (francophones have a french accent speaking english, anglophones have an english accent speaking chinese, etc.) A dialect is the specific variation on the language between native speakers. Of course this doesn't matter a ton in most settings, but it's super helpful when discussing linguistics.

THANKS! THIS IS COOL!

20 8 / 2014

It just doesn’t get old…

It just doesn’t get old…

(Source: hanklerfishcomic)

20 8 / 2014

kuzcotopia-summer-getaway said: In America, there are numerous different accents (Southern, New Yorker, Midwestern, Californian etc.) even though everybody is still speaking English. Is it like that with other languages? Are there different kinds of accents in other languages?

Of course! People from South America can largely tell what country (or part of a country) someone is from by the accent of their Spanish. Every language has different accents…it would be interesting to know which language has the /most/ accents though.

Accents can form two different ways…first, by simple isolation. All languages constantly change, and given time, places that are more culturally cohesive or isolated will change in different ways from each other. This is what happened in the American south, for example. It’s also how the “American” accent drifted apart from the “English” accent.

On the other hand, some accents are holdovers from when people actually spoke different languages (like the way that French people have a “French” accent when they speak English.) These accents persist long after the local population has (for the most part) stopped speaking that language. This is the case for the “Irish” accent, for example, or the ‘Minnesota’ accent (Norwegian, Swedish, and German roots.) Of course, people still speak Irish in Ireland and even Norwegian in Minnesota, but for the most part, we consider these just another “accent” of English while forgetting that they have roots in other languages.

I’d be curious to know which language has the most recognizable accents to native speakers…probably English or Spanish, just because they’re very widely spoken, but I dunno!

20 8 / 2014

WALL OF TEXT ABOUT ONLINE VIDEO!

Everything about online video is different from television (aside from the fact that lots of images are displayed in sequence in order to create the illusion of movement.)

The way the content is made is different, the mindset of the audience is different, the way social structures and fandoms are built is different, the kind of engagement is different, the barrier to entry is non-existent, the rate of change is at least doubled.

But humans are not good at thinking about things differently. Something new exists and, unless we are very young, we attempt to put it in an existing box…or some combination of existing boxes. Online video looks like television, so let’s create “Networks.” Let’s call the page of each creator a “Channel.” Let’s call the thing they do a “Show.” And the people themselves are “Stars.”

Of course this is what we do…creating new words is a hassle, especially when you’re trying to convince existing structures (like your mom, Hollywood executives, and Madison Avenue) that this thing is legitimate and interesting. So you use those old boxes. 

The problem is, the more we use those old boxes, the more everything starts to look like the thing that came before it. 

If we call collections of YouTube channels “Networks” everyone thinks about them like they’re Networks (especially in legacy media.) Then eventually creators start thinking about them as “online TV networks” when really, the needs of online video creators are completely different from the needs of TV creators. 

Suddenly, online video starts looking more like TV not because it should or anyone wants it to, but just because we lack the collective imagination to think of it differently. 

This is an old problem…and not one that can be completely avoided. People aren’t very adaptable. It’s like complaining that it snows in Montana…it’s so expensive to plow the streets, and there are more car accidents, it’s a drain on the economy! But, like, you can’t make it SNOW LESS, that’s ridiculous. 

But to some extent (and maybe not a huge extent) you can change social structures and you can change people. Not to match precisely what online video would be in it’s purest state, but to let some of its unique properties shine through. This will happen no matter what, but I think it will happen /more/ if we’re conscious about it…AND if we put people who actually understand it in charge of some of its more influential structures (YouTube, MCNs, Awards Shows.)

But that’s not what we’re doing. For a few years, YouTube has been led by a guy from Hollywood…so has Maker Studios…so has AwesomenessTV. YouTube is now in the hands of a stronger CEO who is at least from the tech world, which has much less in common with online video than TV does.

That might seem like a bad thing, but I don’t think it is. I think coming at new media with fresh eyes is much better than coming at it with pre-defined boxes. Thinking, “Oh, I see, so this is kinda like a channel…but different in a few ways,” gives you a much less accurate picture than thinking, “This is like nothing I’ve ever seen before…what exactly is it?” 

I (and probably you) came at online video with entirely fresh eyes. I knew nothing about hollywood structures or the roles that networks or agents or awards or channels played in the creation of media. I knew media existed, but the structures that surrounded them were entirely unknown and opaque to me. 

But most people in the online video business did not enter with that innocence, and I think that’s too bad. There are very few people who understand online video solely within the framework of online video in this industry, especially people who have differentiated themselves and gained enough experience to not only /be/ experts, but to be recognized as experts (which are two very different things.)

We’re headed into a world where the people who really get it are getting old enough to differentiate themselves and bring both authenticity and expertise into this industry, but it’s a bit of a battle at the moment…especially because a lot of the bigger companies have already got it into their heads that TV and online video really are very similar. 

And if they think that for long enough, my fear is that eventually, it will become true. Not because it is, but simply because we lacked imagination. 

So if you’re into this…figure out ways to differentiate yourself as an expert who should be recognized as such…then please, send me your resume.

20 8 / 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Introducing Victoria - Episode 1

Victoria’s show is designed to be sort of a video lab notebook, part educational, part experimental. YouTube already has some pretty great science shows (*cough*cough*) but I’m happy to welcome Victoria to the fold. And Iggy too, I guess.

In this episode, in addition to meeting the main characters and hearing some inspiring words about the importance of failure in the scientific method, we learn a bit about cardiac electrophysiology, those nerve impulses that control our heartbeat.

I find that GIF hypnotic. The human heart has its own pacemakers built in. One is known as the sinoatrial (SA) node, the other as the atrioventricular node (AV). These are the upper and lower red dots above, respectively.

Cardiac cells are interesting because they are sort of like nerves and muscle cells combined, they can do work, but they can also propagate electrical impulses (although we should be clear, they are definitely classified as muscle cells). 

Cells of the SA node sort of “leak” charge at a constant rate, which makes them fire (or send an electrical impulse) at that same constant rate. The result is a nice rhythmic heartbeat, controlled by its own cells.

When a heartbeat is initiated by a stray impulse at the bottom (ventricular) region of the heart, that’s what is known as a premature ventricular contraction, or PVC. That’s what happens to Iggy in this episode.

Single, isolated PVCs are pretty harmless, and most of us probably get them from time to time without even noticing. Leave it to Iggy to kill himself by trying to fix a problem that doesn’t exist.

At least Victoria was there to shock him back to life! Wonder if she’ll do that again at some point…?

Looking forward to doing a “Science of Frankenstein MD” episode of SciShow. Thanks to Joe for doing all the science consulting on the show. I LOVE how it’s turned out…such a cool mix of comedy and plot and information and quirkiness. So cool! The first three episodes are already live!!

20 8 / 2014

skottieyoung:

Rocket Raccoon #5 cover

skottieyoung:

Rocket Raccoon #5 cover

20 8 / 2014

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

20 8 / 2014

hugscream:

Guardians of the Galaxy: Minimalist Posters

So… I went to see GotG yesterday and it was great. For a Marvel film I really loved everything about it, and I could write paragraphs on everything I loved however, here are some posters I made to represent each ‘guardian’ (Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Groot and Rocket respectively). I hope you enjoy them, I might do some more characters in the future! And go and see the film if you haven’t already!! 

(Disclaimer: I tried to draw Gamora’s sword and it was so bad so she got the orb.. sorry Gamora)

(via nerdfighter-art)

20 8 / 2014

the-sleepless-draughtsman:

A Date in Amsterdam

I always wanted to illustrate Hazel and Gus’s dinner date, plus my degree in architecture is over and I now have too much free time on my hands, so not only did I do a triptych, but I also decided to animate them, cinemagraph-style. To see the still versions, go to my deviantart here.

P.S. This is my first time making gifs! 

P.P.S. I’m thinking of taking the plunge and putting my prints up on Society6 or something, so I wonder if anyone’s interested? Of course, I’ll probably have to build up a sizeable amount of art first.

(via nerdfighter-art)

20 8 / 2014

What is this?! I want to watch it!

(Source: northernpins, via joshwatchintv)